Grant Vetter 

Curator / Writer / Critic

 
 

ARA 460 / 560 GALLERY EXHIBITIONS: CURATORIAL METHODOLOGIES

Season / Year

Instructor Name: Dr.Grant Vetter

Office Location: TBA

Email: Grant.Vetter@asu.edu

Telephone:480.760.1709

Office hours: TBA

Class Location: TBA

Class Times: TBA

 

My primary office space is in the office at (Add) on ASU Tempe Campus. I am your instructor as well as a resource for information. If you have any questions relative to the course, please feel free to e-mail me at any time. If you have a time conflict with the scheduled office hours, a meeting time can be made that is mutually convenient. 

 

Course Description: 

Gallery Exhibitions: Curatorial Methodologiesis a lecture and practicum course which provides weekly lectures on the history of curatorial practice as well as practical experience organizing an exhibition. Students will learn about the development of exhibition practices through lectures on significant exhibitions, curatorial methodologies, design principles, and critical readings. Each week we will cover over forty significant exhibitions in lecture with a focus on addressing their organization, reception and lasting impact on the field of curatorial practice. Students will develop their own curatorial project with a timeline, proposal, press, budgets, contacts, gallery layout, advertising plan, and selected venue. Research will be supplemented by readings. 

 

Enrollment Requirements: 

None. 

 

Course Objectives:Students will gain a comprehensive overview of the history of curatorial practice as well as learn about the diverse methodologies used by curators today. Each student will learn how to research and organize their own exhibition, including developing a working thesis for an exhibition, a research archive of images, how to write a press release, how to design the layout of a show and how to promote their project across multiple platforms. Upon completion of the course, students will be given the option to submit their proposal to the gallery committee at ASU, if they so choose. Students pursuing museum studies, curatorial studies or art entrepreneurship can produce an exhibition that that would like to curate in the future as a portfolio piece. 

 

Student Learning Outcomes: 

  • Knowledge of critical histories and contemporary practices in curating 
  • The ability to develop an exhibition concept from beginning to end 
  • The ability to write press, advertise and produce other promotional materials related to exhibitions
  • The ability to mobilize different curatorial strategies in service of viewer engagement 
  • The ability to create a practical timeline for funding, shipping, installation, deinstallation, and exhibition design around Best Practices in the arts
  • Learning how to work with artists and the greater arts community 

 

Assignments:

In Gallery Exhibitions: Curatorial Methodologiesthe students develop an archive of materials related to an exhibition proposal that they will develop over the course of the class. This includes learning about different methodologies of curatorial practice and understanding the practical means of submitting, advertising and carrying out an exhibition at the SOA and/or other venues. In addition to developing an exhibition proposal they also engage with artists, guest curators, exhibition preparation, field trips, gallery sitting, and may have the opportunity to talk to the public about SOA art programming. 

 

Week 1 Lecture: Introduction to the Course & The 10 Steps to Curating. 

Homework: Begin thinking about a topic that you would like to curate an exhibition about.

Reading: What Makes a Great Exhibition? Questions of Practice. Edited by Paula Marincola. “Temple / White Cube / Laboratory”. By Iwona Blazwick

 

Week 2 Lecture: Curatorial Histories Part I

Homework: Pick a topic to curate an exhibition about – 5 pts. 

Reading: Curating Now: Imaginative Practice / Public Responsibility. Edited by Paula Marincola “Inventing New Models for the Museum and Its Audience”. 

 

Week 3 Lecture: Curatorial Histories, Part II

Homework: Research other exhibitions on that topic and collect as many press releases or catalogs as you can find on the same or similar themes. Collect this in your archive – 10pts

Readings: On the Museum’s Ruins. By Douglas Crimp. “Chapter 2: The Postmodern Museum” & Thinking About Exhibitions. By Reesa Greenberg, Bruce Ferguson and Sandy Nairne. “Chapter 21: Postmodernism’s Museum without Walls”. By Rosalind Krauss

 

Week 4 Lecture: Curatorial Practice, Part I.

Homework: Build an archive of at least 20 images that fit your exhibition topic – 20 pts.

Reading: Museum Exhibition Planning and Design. By Elizabeth Bogle. “Chapter 1: Phases”.

 

Week 5 Lecture: Curatorial Practice, Part II.

Homework: Pick 5 possible venues to for your exhibition that makes sense with your topic – 5pts.

Reading: The Objects of Experience: Transforming Visitor-Object Encounters in Museums. By Elizabeth Wood and Kiersten F. Latham. Chapter 1 “Object Knowledge” and Chapter 2: “Object Knowledge Framework”.

 

Week 6 Lecture: Curatorial Methodologies, Part I.

Homework: Pick a method or methods for organizing and analyzing your exhibition topic. Turn in notes that answer the 4 methodological questions in relation to your exhibition topic to the best of your ability (See methodologies handout) – 10pts. 

Reading: Biennials, Triennials and Documenta: The Exhibitions that Created Contemporary Art. By Charles Green and Anthony Gardner, “Chapter 1: 1972: The Rise of the Star Curator”. 

 

Week 7 Lecture: Curatorial Methodologies, Part II.

Homework: Pick a location / institution for your exhibition and make a floorplan layout of your exhibition that considers the order and relevance of the works in your exhibition – 5pts. 

Reading: Thinking About Exhibitions. By Reesa Greenberg, Bruce Ferguson and Sandy Nairne. “Chapter 13: From Museum Curator to Exhibition Auteur: Inventing a Singular Position.” By Nathalie Heinich and Mark Poolak

 

Week 8 Lecture: Curatorial Design, Part I.

Homework: Write the press release for the exhibition and turn it in – 5 pt.

Reading: Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display. Edited by Ivan Karp and Steven D. Lavine. “Chapter 1: The Museum as a Way of Seeing. By Svetlana Alpers”

 

Week 9: Curatorial Design, Part II.

Homework: Write the wall didactic that will greet visitors as they enter the exhibition – 5 pts.

Reading: The Art of Museum Exhibitions: How Story and Imagination Create Aesthetic Experience. By Leslie Bedford. “Chapter 6: Creating and Experiencing the Exhibition as Medium.” 

 

Week 10: Spring Break / Holiday

 

Week 11 Lecture: Philosophies of Curation, Part I

Homework: Write the information cards that will go with each piece making sure to provide greater contextualization for the work at it relates to the exhibition concept – 20 pts.

Reading: The Curatorial: A Philosophy of Curating. By Jean-Peal Martinon. “Chapter 2: Theses in the Philosophy of Curating.” By Jean-Peal Martinon.

 

Week 12: Philosophies of Curation Part II

Homework: Make your final PowerPoint presentation for the class of your exhibition project following the categories on the handout – 25 pts. 

Readings: Thinking Contemporary Curating. By Terry Smith “Chapter 1: What is Contemporary Curatorial Thought?” and “Chapter 5: Curatorial Practice Now.” 

 

Week 13: Student Presentations: Share your Exhibition Proposal with the class.

 

Week 14: Student PresentationsShare you Exhibition Proposal with the class.

 

Week 15: Guest Speaker / Field Trip

 

Due Dates and Late Work 

Unless otherwise instructed, all assignments are due at the beginning of class the day of the specified due date.

This is especially true on presentation days because you will be presenting. The assignment due dates will be listed on the assignment descriptions posted to Blackboard. Unless Blackboard goes down for the entire time between when the assignment is given and when it is due, late assignments will not be accepted. 

 

Required Primary and Secondary Materials (e.g., readings, videos, podcasts, films and studio supplies) 

There is no standard text for the course. Readings will be posted in Canvas.

 

Course Itinerary (Schedule):

WEEK 1: Introduction to Course Material& The 10 Steps to Curating

WEEK 2: Curatorial Histories Part I – Step 1: Pick a Topic. 

WEEK 3: Curatorial Histories Part II – Step 2: Research Exhibitions on the same Topic.

WEEK 4: Curatorial Practice Part I – Step 3: Develop an Archive of Artists/Images.

WEEK 5: Curatorial Practice Part II – Step 4: Pick an appropriate Venue(s).

WEEK 6: Curatorial Methodologies Part I – Step 5: Pick a Curatorial Method(s).

WEEK 7: Curatorial Methodologies Part II – Step 6: Pick a Location and Develop the Exhibition Layout.

WEEK 8: Curatorial Design Part I – Step 7: Write a Press Release.

WEEK 9: Curatorial Design Part II – Step 8: Write a Wall Didactic.

WEEK 10: SPRING BREAK

WEEK 11: Philosophies of Curation Part I – Step 9: Write Title Cards with Greater Contextual Information.

WEEK 12:  Philosophies of Curation Part II – Step 10: Organize You Final Presentation / Proposal and Pitch Your Exhibition Topic.

WEEK 13: Student Presentations – Share your Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 mins)

WEEK 14: Student Presentations – Share your Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 Mins)

WEEK 15: Guest Speaker / Field Trip

 

Grading, including grade scale 

Point equal Percentages 

Homework assignment Week 2: Pick a topic to curate an exhibition around as well as a time period or periods, geographic local and/or locals and the culture or cultures that you want to investigate. Write these down and turn them in on Canvas – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 3: Research other exhibitions on that topic and collect as many press releases or catalogs as you can find on the same or similar themes. Collect this in your archive. Print these out and turn them in on Canvas– 10 pts

Homework assignment Week 4: Build an archive of at least 20 images that fit your exhibition topic. Print these out and turn them in on Canvas – 20 pts (Always include the full name, title of the piece, year of completion, medium, dimensions and a few facts about each piece that pertain to the exhibition topic)

Homework assignment Week 5: Pick 5 possible venues to for your exhibition that makes sense with your topic. Write these down and turn them in on Canvas– 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 6: Pick a method or methods for organizing and analyzing your exhibition topic. Turn in your notes that answer the 4 methodological questions related to your exhibition topic to the best of your ability on Canvas– 10 pts 

Homework assignment Week 7: Pick a location/institution for your exhibition and make a floorplan layout of your exhibition that considers the order and relevance of the works in your exhibition on Canvas– 5pts. 

Homework assignment Week 8Write the press release for the exhibition and turn it in on Canvas – 5 pt.

Homework assignment Week 9: Write the wall didactic that will greet visitors as they enter the exhibition on Canvas – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 10: Holiday

Homework assignment Week 11Write the information cards that will go with each piece including greater contextualization that relates to the exhibition concept and turn them in on Canvas – 20 pts.

Homework Week 12: Make your final power point presentation following the presentation guide – 25 pts.

Homework Week 13: Student Presentations

Homework Week 14: Student Presentations

Week 15: Guest Speaker / Field Trip

 

Total Point Breakdown

Homework: 75 points

Final Presentation: 25 points

Total100 points 

 

Participation Policy

You are fully encouraged to ask questions at any time in the course and to bring a computer, tablet or other device to class for notetaking, looking up other information related to class topics, research purposes, etc. It is not mandatory, but it is recommended. 

You should not be on a computer, tablet, your phone or any other device accessing any information that does not pertain to class. You should not be watching movies, posting on social networks, etc. 

The T.A. will be sitting at the back of class monitoring. If the T.A. has to interrupt class to ask you to refocus your attention on the course material you will lose points. 

1stoffense: 1 pt

2ndoffense: 2 pts

3rdoffense: 4 pts

4thoffense: 8 pts

5thoffense: 16 pts

Please, do not access unrelated class material. 

You should also not be visiting with classmates, texting, etc., during class. Anything that is disruptive to the class environment may result in a loss of points.

 

Grade Scale 

98-100 

A+ 

93-97 

90-92 

A- 

88-89 

B+ 

83-87 

80-82 

B- 

78-79 

C+ 

70-77 

60-69 

0-59 

 

 

Attendance Policy:
The instructor’s general policy AND university policy on absences due to religious observance and university sanctioned activities such as: 

Attendance and participation for the duration of the class period is mandatory. If you have more than 3 absences (unexcused), your final grade will be lowered 1/3 grade for each subsequent absence (i.e. B to B-).  You should notify me by email prior to absence if possible and provide doctor’s note where applicable. Repeated tardiness and leaving class early will be recorded, and as a result, your final grade will be lowered.  It is the student's responsibility to keep track of his/her absences. 

Excused absences related to religious observances/practices in accord with ACD 304–04, “Accommodation for Religious Practices.” Students may be excused for the observance of religious holidays. Students should notify the instructor at the beginning of the semester about the need to be absent from class due to religious observances. Students will be responsible for materials covered during their absence and should consult with the instructor to arrange reasonable accommodation for missed exams or other required assignments.

Excused absences related to university sanctioned activities in accord withACD 304–02, “Missed Classes Due to University-Sanctioned Activities.” SAMPLE STATEMENT:  Students required to miss classes due to university sanctioned activities will not be counted absent. However, absence from class or examinations due to university-sanctioned activities does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required during the period of the absence. Students should inform the instructor early in the semester of upcoming scheduled absences and immediately upon learning of unscheduled required class absences. Reasonable accommodation to make up missed exams or other required assignments will be made. Consult the instructor BEFORE the absence to arrange for this accommodation.

 

Academic Integrity and Student Code of Conduct:

Besides academic performance, students should exhibit the qualities of honesty and integrity. Every student is expected to produce his/her original, independent work. Any student whose work indicates a violation of the ASU Academic Misconduct Policy including cheating, plagiarism, and dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism is defined as deliberately passing off someone else’s words or ideas as your

own. All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. Arizona State University and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts expect the highest standards of academic integrity from all students. Failure to meet these standards may result in suspension or expulsion from the university or other sanctions as specified in the University Student Academic Integrity Policy. For more information, please see the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy: http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity.Per ASU policy, a student may not avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty by withdrawing from a course, and may be placed back in the course in order to face sanctions resulting from academic integrity violations. You are responsible for abiding by this policy.

 

In addition, ASU adheres to a university-wide Student Code of Conduct. The philosophy behind this policy states: The aim of education is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the individual. The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change and respect for the rights of all individuals. Self-discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the university community are necessary for the fulfillment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed to promote this environment at each of the state universities.

 

Instructor Absence Policy:

Students should wait for an absent instructor15 minutes in class sessions of 90 minutes or less, and 30 minutes for those lasting more than 90 minutes, unless directed otherwise by someone from the academic unit.   

 

Academic Integrity and Student Code of Conduct:

Besides academic performance, students should exhibit the qualities of honesty and integrity. Every student is expected to produce his/her original, independent work. Any student whose work indicates a violation of the ASU Academic Misconduct Policy including cheating, plagiarism, and dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism is defined as deliberately passing off someone else’s words or ideas as your own. All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. Arizona State University and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts expect the highest standards of academic integrity from all students. Failure to meet these standards may result in suspension or expulsion from the university or other sanctions as specified in the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy       (http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity), “[e]ach student must act with honesty and integrity, and must respect the rights of others in carrying out all academic assignments.” This policy also defines academic dishonesty and sets a process for faculty members and colleges to sanction dishonesty. Violations of this policy fall into five broad areas that include but are not limited to:

  • Cheating on an academic evaluation or assignments 
  • Plagiarizing
  • Academic deceit, such as fabricating data or information
  • Aiding Academic Integrity Policy violations and inappropriately collaborating
  • Falsifying academic records

I sanction any incidents of academic dishonesty in my courses using University and HIDA    guidelines. Should you have any question about whether or not something falls subject to this clause, feel free to contact me or review the university policy on academic integrity at the above link. Per ASU policy, a student may not avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty by withdrawing from a course, and may be placed back in the course in order to face sanctions resulting from academic integrity violations. You are responsible for abiding by this policy.

 

Copyright:

Students must refrain from uploading to any course shell, discussion board, or website used by the course instructor or other course forum, material that is not the student's original work, unless the students first comply with all applicable copyright laws; faculty members reserve the right to delete materials on the grounds of suspected copyright infringement. A statement that the course content, including lectures and other handouts, is  copyrighted material. Students may not share outside the class, upload, sell, or distribute course content or notes taken during the conduct of the course (see ACD 304–06, “Commercial Note Taking Services” for more information). THIS CONTENT IS PROTECTED AND MAY NOT BE SHARED, UPLOADED, SOLD, OR DISTRIBUTED.

 

Student Conduct:

ASU adheres to a university-wide Student Code of Conduct. The philosophy behind this policy states: The aim of education is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the individual. The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change and respect for the rights of all individuals. Self-discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the university community are necessary for the fulfillment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed to promote this environment at each of the state universities. You are expected to treat your instructor and your fellow classmates with respect and kindness. In all correspondence and in Discussion Board postings, you should show respect for the viewpoints of others who may disagree with you or see things from a different perspective. Criticizing, ridiculing, insulting, or belittling others will not be accepted. Keep in mind that electronic communications do not have the advantage of nonverbal cues that are so much a part of interpersonal communication. Humor or satire can sometimes be misinterpreted in strictly electronic communication forums.

 

Threatening or disruptive behavior:

Self -discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the classroom or studio and university community are necessary for a conducive learning and teaching environment. Threatening or violent behavior will result in the administrative withdrawal of the student from the class. Disruptive behavior may result in the removal of the student from the class. Threatening, violent, or disruptive behavior will not be tolerated in this class, and will be handled in accordance with ASU policy. For more information please visit: https://eoss.asu.edu/dos/srr/PoliciesAndProceduresand  https://eoss.asu.edu/dos/safety/ThreateningBehavior.

 

Title IX:

Title IX is a federal law that provides that no person be excluded on the basis of sex from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity.  Both Title IX and university policy make clear that sexual violence and harassment based on sex is prohibited.  An individual who believes they have been subjected to sexual violence or harassed on the basis of sex can seek support, including counseling and academic support, from the university.  If you or someone you know has been harassed on the basis of sex or sexually assaulted, you can find information and resources athttp://sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/faqs/students

 

Classroom Behavior (Technology Usage):

It is encouraged that you bring technology (cell phones, tablets and laptops) to class to help you take notes and do research, however please turn off cell phone ringers and do not use your phone to make personal calls in class or use any technology to use social media in class. Do not answer your phone in class. If you believe you are receiving an emergency call, please step outside to take it.

 

Withdrawal:

If you are unable to complete the course, it is your responsibility to arrange for withdrawal from the class. You will not be automatically withdrawn and unless you are officially withdrawn from the course you will receive a final grade based upon the total points you have earned for the semester. Students are required to pay all tuition and fees for any registered course unless enrollment is officially cancelled during the 100% refund period.Please visit the Academic Calendar to review the withdrawal deadlines for this semester. For more information on Drop/Add and Withdrawl visit: https://students.asu.edu/drop-add

 

Special Accommodations:

Your instructor is willing to make any reasonable adaptations for limitations due to any documented disability, including learning disabilities. Please contact the instructor during office hours or by appointment to discuss any special needs you may have. You must contact the Disability Resource Center to process the paperwork for special course accommodations. To request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact the ASU Disability Resource Center (http://www.asu.edu/studentaffairs/ed/drc/# ; Phone: (480) 965-1234; TDD: (480) 965-9000). This is a very important step as accommodations may be difficult to make retroactively.   If you have a letter from their office indicating that you have a disability which requires academic accommodations, in order to assure that you receive your accommodations in a timely manner, please present this documentation to me no later than the end of the first week of the semester so that your needs can be addressed effectively.

 

Disability Support Services:

Students with disabilities must have an equally effective and equivalent educational opportunity as those students without disabilities. Students experiencing difficulty accessing course materials because of a disability are expected to contact the course instructor so that a solution can be found that provides all students equal access to course materials and technology. Qualified students with disabilities who will require disability accommodations in this class are encouraged to make their requests to me at the beginning of the semester either during office hours or by appointment. It may be difficult to make accommodations retroactively. Note: Prior to receiving disability accommodations, verification of eligibility from the Disability Resource Center (DRC) is required. Disability information is confidential.

 

Information for Students with Disabilities:

Students who feel they will need disability accommodations in this class but have not registered with the Disability Resource Center (DRC) should contact DRC immediately. Students should contact the Disability Resource Center on the campus that your class is being held. Campus-specific location and contact information can be found on the DRC website. DRC offices are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. Check the DRC website for eligibility and documentation policies (https://eoss.asu.edu/drc) 

 

Policy on Sexual Discrimination:

Policy on sexual discrimination as described in ACD 401, "Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation", including the fact that the instructor is a mandated reporter and therefore obligated to report any information regarding alleged acts of sexual discrimination. Arizona State University is committed to providing an environment free of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation for the entire university community, including all students, faculty members, staff employees, and guests. ASU expressly prohibits discriminationharassment, and retaliation by employees, students, contractors, or agents of the university based on any protected status: race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, and genetic information.As an employee of ASU, I am a mandated reporter and obligated to report instances of reported or suspected incidences of sexual harassment.

 

Student Rights and Responsibilities:

Students must abide by all the requirements stated in this syllabus. In addition, all students should be aware of their rights and responsibilities at Arizona State University. Please reference the college catalog and student handbook for student rights and responsibilities.

These can be found here:

http://herbergerinstitute.asu.edu/students/undergrad/documents/student_handbook.pdf

 

Student Services & Resources:

You will find a list of student resources at: https://tutoring.asu.edu/student-resources

Resources included are advisement, registration, financial aid, disability services, counseling, tutoring, library, and more.

 

Academic Calendar and Important Dates:

The academic calendar can be found here: https://students.asu.edu/academic-calendar

 

Subject to change:

The Instructor reserves the right to change portions of this syllabus (assignments, deadlines etc.) by verbal instructions during scheduled class time. The student is responsible for noting changes and acting accordingly. Grading and absence policies are not subject to change.

 

Computer, Internet, and Electronic Communications Policy:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd125.html

Missed Classes Due to University Sanctioned Activities:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-02.html

Accommodations for Religious Practices:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-04.html

Handling Disruptive, Threatening, or Violent Individuals on Campus:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/ssm/ssm104-02.html

For more information, refer to: www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-10.html

 

University Course Guidelines can be found here:

https://provost.asu.edu/curriculum-development/changemaker/syllabus-guidelines

 

IMPORTANT UNIVERSITY DATES

Please make a note of these important dates during the fall 2018 semester:

Session Dates and Deadlines

Session A: 7.5 weeks

(Aug 16 – Oct 5)

Session B: 7.5 weeks

(Oct 11 – Dec 1)

Session C: 15 weeks

(Aug 17 – Dec 1)

Classes Begin

August 16, 2018

October 10, 2018

August 16, 2018

Drop/Add Deadline

August 17, 2018

October 11, 2018

August 22, 2018

Tuition and Fees 100% Refund Deadline

August 22, 2018

October 16, 2018

August 29, 2018

Course Withdrawal Deadline

September 5, 2018

October 30, 2018

October 31, 2018

Complete Session Withdrawal  Deadline

October 5, 2018

November 30, 2018

November 30, 2018

Fall Break

October 6-9, 2018

Final Grades Due

October 8, 2018

December 3-10, 2018

December 3-10, 2018

For additional university deadlines and important dates for the fall 2018 term, please visit: students.asu.edu/academic-calendar.

 

 

ARA 460 / 560: GALLERY EXHIBITIONS: CURATORIAL PRACTICE AND MULTICULTURALISM

Season / Year

Instructor Name: Dr.Grant Vetter

Office Location: TBA

Email: Grant.Vetter@asu.edu

Telephone:480.760.1709

Office hours: TBA

Class Location: TBA

Class Times: TBA

 

My primary office space is in the office at (Add) on ASU Tempe Campus. I am your instructor as well as a resource for information. If you have any questions relative to the course, please feel free to e-mail me at any time. If you have a time conflict with the scheduled office hours, a meeting time can be made that is mutually convenient. 

 

Course Description: 

Curatorial Practice: Multiculturalismis a lecture and practicum course which provides weekly lectures on the history of curatorial practice as well as practical experience organizing an exhibition. Students will learn about the development of exhibition practices through lectures on curatorial methodologies on significant exhibitions that engage with Feminist art, LGBTQAI+ art, Black art, Latin American art, and the art of First Nation peoples. Each week we will cover over forty significant exhibitions in lecture with a focus on addressing their organization, reception and lasting impact on the field of curatorial practice. Students will develop their own curatorial project with a timeline, proposal, press, budgets, contacts, gallery layout, advertising plan, and selected venue. Research will be supported by readings and in-class discussions.

 

Enrollment Requirements: 

None. 

 

Course Objectives: Students will gain a comprehensive overview of the history of curatorial practice as well as learn about the diverse curatorial methodologies associated with pluralist and/or multicultural projects in the arts. Each student will learn how to research and organize their own exhibition, including developing a working thesis for an exhibition, a research archive of images, how to write a press release, how to design the layout of an exhibition and how to advertise their exhibition and produce a catalog essay. Upon completion of the course, students will be given the option to submit their proposal to the gallery committee at ASU, if they so choose. Students pursuing museum studies, curatorial studies or art entrepreneurship can produce an exhibition that that would like to curate in the future as a portfolio piece. 

 

Student Learning Outcomes: 

  • Knowledge of critical histories and contemporary practices in curating that focus on identity politics, pluralism, sexual / gender difference and multiculturalism.  
  • The ability to develop an exhibition concept from beginning to end with a focus on inclusivity, equality and diversity. 
  • The ability to write press, advertise and produce other promotional materials related to exhibition that address a wide cross section of issues in culture, society and politics.
  • The ability to mobilize different curatorial strategies in service of creating greater viewer engagement, social change and serving the public good.
  • The ability to create a practical timeline for funding, shipping, insurance, installation, deinstallation, and exhibition design around Best Practices in the arts.
  • Learning how to work with artists and the concerns of the greater arts community. 

 

Assignments:

In Gallery Exhibitions with a focus on multiculturalism and curatorial practice, the students learn to develop an archive of materials related to an exhibition proposal that they will develop over the course of the class. This includes learning about different methodologies of curatorial practice and understanding the practical means of submitting, advertising and carrying out an exhibition at the SOA and/or other venues. In addition to developing an exhibition proposal they also engage with artists, guest curators, exhibition preparation, field trips, gallery sitting, and may have the opportunity to talk to the public about SOA art programming. 

 

Week 1 Lecture: Introduction to Curatorial History. 

Homework: Begin thinking about a topic that you would like to curate an exhibition about that works to a create positive change through different artistic voices, projects and perspectives. 

Readings: Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display. Edited by Ivan Karp and Steven D. Lavine. “Introduction: Museums and Multiculturalism.” By Steven D. Lavine and Ivan Karp. & Reinventing the Museum: The Evolving Conversation on the Paradigm Shift. Edited by Gail Anderson. Chapter 8: “The Real Multiculturalism: A Struggle for Authority and Power.” 

 

Week 2 Lecture: Methodologies of Curatorial Practice, Part I.

Homework: Pick a topic to curate an exhibition about that has a specific theme, time(s), place(s) and/or culture(s) - 5 points. 

Readings: By Amalia Mesa-Bains & Museums, Equality and Social Justice. Edited by Richard Sandell and Eirhne Nightingale. “Chapter 13: Museums as Intercultural Spaces.” By Simona Bodo. By Edmund Barry Gaither & Reinventing the MuseumThe Evolving Conversation on the Paradigm Shift.“Chapter 41: Multicultural Organizational Development in Nonprofit Organizations: Lessons from the Cultural Competence Learning Initiative.” By Laurin Mayeno and Steve Lew.

 

Week 3 Lecture: Methodologies of Curatorial Practice, Part II.

Homework: Research other exhibitions on that topic and collect as many press releases or catalogs as you can find on the same or similar themes. Collect this in your archive – 10pts

Readings: Thinking About Exhibitions. By Reesa Greenberg, Bruce Ferguson and Sandy Nairne. “Chapter 5: The Exhibitionary Complex.” By Tony Bennet. & “Chapter 27: What’s important about the History of Modern Art Exhibitions?” By Martha Ward. 

 

Week 4 Lecture: Feminism and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I. 

Homework:Build an archive of at least 20 images that fit your exhibition topic, make sure to include women artists, artists from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds and LGBTQPlus artists – 20 pts.

Readings: New Museum Theory and Practice: An Introduction. Chapter 2, “Feminist Curatorial Strategies Since the 1970s.” By Katy Deepwell. & Feminisms is Still Our Name: Seven Essays on Historiography and Curatorial Practice.Edited by Malin Hedlin Hayden and Jessica Sjoholm Skrubbe. “Chapter 2: The Return of Feminism(s) and the Visual Arts, 1979-2009.” By Amelia Jones. 

 

Week 5 Lecture: Feminism and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II. 

Homework: Pick 5 possible venues to for your exhibition that makes sense with your topic – 5pts.

Readings: Feminist Art Theory: An Anthology, 1968-2014. Edited by Hilary Robinson. Chapter 1.2 Curating Feminisms ‘Art and Feminism: An Ideology of Shifting Criteria” By Cornelia Butler. & “Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: 86 Steps in 45 Years of Art and Feminism. By Xabier Arakistain.

 

Week 6 Lecture: LGBTQIA+ Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I.

Homework: Pick a method or methods for organizing and analyzing your exhibition topic. Turn in notes that answer the 4 methodological questions in relation to your exhibition topic to the best of your ability – 10pts.

Reading: On Curating. Issue #37. Edited by Jonathan Katz and Änne Söll. “Challenging Hetero-centricism and Lesbo-/Homo-phobia: A History of LGBTQ exhibitions in the U.S. By Maura Reily & Curatorial Activism: Towards an Ethics of Curating. “Chapter 4. Challenging Heterocentricism and Lesbo-Homophobia.” By Jonathan Weinberg.

 

Week 7: LGBTQAI+ Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II. 

Homework: Pick a location / institution for your exhibition and make a floorplan layout of your exhibition that considers the order and relevance of the works in your exhibition – 5pts. 

Reading: On Curating. Issue #37. Edited by Jonathan Katz and Änne Söll. “The Queer Institutional, Or How to Inspire Queer Curating.” By Isabel Hufschmidt & Museums, Equality and Social Justice.Edited by Richard Sandell and Eirhne Nightingale. “Unpacking Gender: Creating Complex Models for Gender Inclusivity in Museums”. By Amy K. Levin. 

 

Week 8 Lecture: Black Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I. 

Homework: Write the press release for the exhibition and turn it in – 5 pt.

Reading: Museums and Communities: The Politics of Public Culture.Edited by Ivan Karp, Christine Mullen Kreamer and Steven D. Lavine. “Chapter 17: Mythos, Memory, and History: African American Preservation Efforts.” By Faith Davis Ruffins. & Curatorial Activism: Towards and Ethics of Curating.Chapter 3: “Tackling White Privilege and Western-Centrism”. By Judith Wilson. 

 

Week 9 Lecture: Black Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II. 

Homework: Write the wall didactic that will greet visitors as they enter the exhibition – 5 pts.

Reading: Thinking About Exhibitions. Edited by Reesa Greenberg, Bruce W. Fergson and Sandy Nairne. “Chapter 16: Free-Fall – Freeze Frame: Africa, exhibitions, artists.” By Clementine Deliss. & Reinventing the Museum: The Evolving Conversation on the Paradigm Shift.Edited by Gail Anderson. “Mining the Museum: An Installation Confronting History.” By Lisa G. Corrin. 

 

Week 10: Spring Break / Holiday

 

Week 11 Lecture: Latin American Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I

Homework: Write the information cards that will go with each piece including greater contextualization that relates to the exhibition concept – 20 pts.

Reading: Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display. Edited by Ivan Karp and Steven D. Lavine. “Chapter 7: The Poetics and Politics of Hispanic Art: A New Perspective.” By Jane Livingston and John Beardsley & “Chapter 9: The Chicano Movement / The Movement of Chicano Art.” By Tomas Ybarra-Frausto. 

 

Week 12 Lecture: Latin American Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II. 

Homework: Make your final powerpoint presentation for the class of your exhibition project following the categories on the handout – 20 pts. 

Readings: Thinking About Exhibitions. Edited by Reesa Greenberg, Bruce W. Fergson and Sandy Nairne. “Brokering Identities: Art Curators and the Politics of Cultural Representation.” By Mari Carmen Ramírez & Museums and Communities: The Politics of Public Culture.Edited by Ivan Karp, Christine Mullen Kreamer and Steven D. Lavine. “Chapter 3: The Other Vanguard.” By Gullermo Gómez-Peña.

 

Week 13 Lecture: First Nation Peoples and Curatorial Methodologies. 

Homework: Revise and Edit your final powerpoint presentation for the class of your exhibition project and write a short 1-3 page introductory catalog essay that explains the historical, cultural and personal context of the works in your proposal – 5 pts.  

Readings: Thinking About Exhibitions. Edited by Reesa Greenberg, Bruce W. Fergson and Sandy Nairne. “Modernism, Nationalism and Beyond: A Critical History of First Nation Art.” By Diana Nemiroff. & Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display. Edited by Ivan Karp and Steven D. Lavine. “Chapter 13: The Poetic Image and Native American Art”. By Patrick T. Houlihan. 

 

Week 14: Student Presentations: Share Your Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 mins).

 

Week 15: Student Presentations: Share Your Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 mins). 

 

Unless otherwise instructed, all assignments are due at the beginning of class the day of the specified due date.

This is especially true on presentation days because you will be presenting. The assignment due dates will be listed on the assignment descriptions posted to Blackboard. Unless Blackboard goes down for the entire time between when the assignment is given and when it is due, late assignments will not be accepted. 

 

Required Primary and Secondary Materials (e.g., readings, videos, podcasts, films and studio supplies) 

There is no standard text for the course. Readings will be posted in Canvas.

 

Course Itinerary (Schedule):

WEEK 1: Introduction to Curatorial History & The 10 Steps to Curating

WEEK 2: Methodologies of Curatorial Practice, Part I– Step 1: Pick a Topic. 

WEEK 3: Methodologies of Curatorial Practice, Part II–Step 2: Research Exhibitions on the same Topic.

WEEK 4: Feminism and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I– Step 3: Develop an Archive of Artists/Images.

WEEK 5: Feminism and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II– Step 4: Pick an appropriate Venue(s).

WEEK 6: LGBTQAI+ Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I– Step 5: Pick a Curatorial Method(s).

WEEK 7: LGBTQAI+ Art and Curatorial Methodologies,Part II– Step 6: Pick a Location and Develop the Exhibition Layout.

WEEK 8: Black Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I– Step 7: Write a Press Release.

WEEK 9: Black Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II– Step 8: Write a Wall Didactic.

WEEK 10: SPRING BREAK

WEEK 11: Latin American Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part I– Step 9: Write Title Cards with Greater Contextual Information.

WEEK 12: Latin American Art and Curatorial Methodologies, Part II– Step 10: Organize You Final Presentation / Proposal and Pitch Your Exhibition Topic w/short catalog essay.

WEEK 13: First Nation Peoples and Curatorial Methodologies – Share your Proposal with the class.

WEEK 14: Student Presentations – Share your Proposal with the class (10 mins).

WEEK 15:Student Presentations – Share your Proposal with the class(10 mins).

 

Grading, including grade scale 

Point equal Percentages 

Homework assignment Week 2: Pick a topic to curate an exhibition around as well as a time period or periods, geographic local and/or locals and the culture or cultures that you want to investigate. Write these down and turn them in – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 3: Research other exhibitions on that topic and collect as many press releases or catalogs as you can find on the same or similar themes. Collect this in your archive. Print these out and turn them in – 10 pts

Homework assignment Week 4: Build an archive of at least 20 images that fit your exhibition topic. Print these out and turn them in – 20 pts (Always include the full name, title of the piece, year of completion, medium, dimensions and a few facts about each piece that pertain to the exhibition topic)

Homework assignment Week 5: Pick 5 possible venues to for your exhibition that makes sense with your topic. Write these down and turn them in – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 6: Pick a method or methods for organizing and analyzing your exhibition topic. Turn in notes that answer the 4 methodological questions in relation to your exhibition topic to the best of your ability – 10 pts 

Homework assignment Week 7: Pick a location/institution for your exhibition and make a floorplan layout of your exhibition that considers the order and relevance of the works in your exhibition – 5pts. 

Homework assignment Week 8Write the press release for the exhibition and turn it in – 5 pt.

Homework assignment Week 9: Write the wall didactic that will greet visitors as they enter the exhibition – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 10: Holiday

Homework assignment Week 11Write the information cards that will go with each piece including greater contextualization that relates to the exhibition concept – 20 pts.

Homework Week 12: Make your final power point presentation following the presentation guide – 20 pts 

Homework Week 13: Write a short 1-3 essay exploring the greater context of works in the show  – 5pts

Week 14: Student Presentations

Week 15: Student Presentations

 

Total Point Breakdown

Homework: 80 points

Final Presentation: 20 points

Total100 points 

 

Participation Policy

You are fully encouraged to ask questions at any time in the course and to bring a computer, tablet or other device to class for notetaking, looking up other information related to class topics, research purposes, etc. It is not mandatory, but it is recommended. 

You should not be on a computer, tablet, your phone or any other device accessing any information that does not pertain to class. You should not be watching movies, posting on social networks, etc. 

The T.A. will be sitting at the back of class monitoring. If the T.A. has to interrupt class to ask you to refocus your attention on the course material you will lose points. 

1st offense: 1 pt

2nd offense: 2 pts

3rd offense: 4 pts

4th offense: 8 pts

5th offense: 16 pts

Please, do not access unrelated class material. 

You should also not be visiting with classmates, texting, etc., during class. Anything disruptive to the class environment will result in a loss of points.

 

Grade Scale 

98-100 

A+ 

93-97 

90-92 

A- 

88-89 

B+ 

83-87 

80-82 

B- 

78-79 

C+ 

70-77 

60-69 

0-59 

 

Attendance Policy:
The instructor’s general policy AND university policy on absences due to religious observance and university sanctioned activities such as: 

Attendance and participation for the duration of the class period is mandatory. If you have more than 3 absences (unexcused), your final grade will be lowered 1/3 grade for each subsequent absence (i.e. B to B-).  You should notify me by email prior to absence if possible and provide doctor’s note where applicable. Repeated tardiness and leaving class early will be recorded, and as a result, your final grade will be lowered.  It is the student's responsibility to keep track of his/her absences. 

Excused absences related to religious observances/practices in accord with ACD 304–04, “Accommodation for Religious Practices.” Students may be excused for the observance of religious holidays. Students should notify the instructor at the beginning of the semester about the need to be absent from class due to religious observances. Students will be responsible for materials covered during their absence and should consult with the instructor to arrange reasonable accommodation for missed exams or other required assignments.

Excused absences related to university sanctioned activities in accord withACD 304–02, “Missed Classes Due to University-Sanctioned Activities.” SAMPLE STATEMENT:  Students required to miss classes due to university sanctioned activities will not be counted absent. However, absence from class or examinations due to university-sanctioned activities does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required during the period of the absence. Students should inform the instructor early in the semester of upcoming scheduled absences and immediately upon learning of unscheduled required class absences. Reasonable accommodation to make up missed exams or other required assignments will be made. Consult the instructor BEFORE the absence to arrange for this accommodation.

 

Academic Integrity and Student Code of Conduct:

Besides academic performance, students should exhibit the qualities of honesty and integrity. Every student is expected to produce his/her original, independent work. Any student whose work indicates a violation of the ASU Academic Misconduct Policy including cheating, plagiarism, and dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism is defined as deliberately passing off someone else’s words or ideas as your

own. All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. Arizona State University and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts expect the highest standards of academic integrity from all students. Failure to meet these standards may result in suspension or expulsion from the university or other sanctions as specified in the University Student Academic Integrity Policy. For more information, please see the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy: http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity.Per ASU policy, a student may not avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty by withdrawing from a course, and may be placed back in the course in order to face sanctions resulting from academic integrity violations. You are responsible for abiding by this policy.

In addition, ASU adheres to a university-wide Student Code of Conduct. The philosophy behind this policy states: The aim of education is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the individual. The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change and respect for the rights of all individuals. Self-discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the university community are necessary for the fulfillment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed to promote this environment at each of the state universities.

 

Instructor Absence Policy:

Students should wait for an absent instructor15 minutes in class sessions of 90 minutes or less, and 30 minutes for those lasting more than 90 minutes, unless directed otherwise by someone from the academic unit.   

 

Academic Integrity and Student Code of Conduct:

Besides academic performance, students should exhibit the qualities of honesty and integrity. Every student is expected to produce his/her original, independent work. Any student whose work indicates a violation of the ASU Academic Misconduct Policy including cheating, plagiarism, and dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism is defined as deliberately passing off someone else’s words or ideas as your own. All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. Arizona State University and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts expect the highest standards of academic integrity from all students. Failure to meet these standards may result in suspension or expulsion from the university or other sanctions as specified in the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy       (http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity), “[e]ach student must act with honesty and integrity, and must respect the rights of others in carrying out all academic assignments.” This policy also defines academic dishonesty and sets a process for faculty members and colleges to sanction dishonesty. Violations of this policy fall into five broad areas that include but are not limited to:

  • Cheating on an academic evaluation or assignments 
  • Plagiarizing
  • Academic deceit, such as fabricating data or information
  • Aiding Academic Integrity Policy violations and inappropriately collaborating
  • Falsifying academic records 

I sanction any incidents of academic dishonesty in my courses using University and HIDA    guidelines. Should you have any question about whether or not something falls subject to this clause, feel free to contact me or review the university policy on academic integrity at the above link. Per ASU policy, a student may not avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty by withdrawing from a course, and may be placed back in the course in order to face sanctions resulting from academic integrity violations. You are responsible for abiding by this policy.

 

Copyright:

Students must refrain from uploading to any course shell, discussion board, or website used by the course instructor or other course forum, material that is not the student's original work, unless the students first comply with all applicable copyright laws; faculty members reserve the right to delete materials on the grounds of suspected copyright infringement. A statement that the course content, including lectures and other handouts, is  copyrighted material. Students may not share outside the class, upload, sell, or distribute course content or notes taken during the conduct of the course (see ACD 304–06, “Commercial Note Taking Services” for more information). THIS CONTENT IS PROTECTED AND MAY NOT BE SHARED, UPLOADED, SOLD, OR DISTRIBUTED.

 

Student Conduct:

ASU adheres to a university-wide Student Code of Conduct. The philosophy behind this policy states: The aim of education is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the individual. The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change and respect for the rights of all individuals. Self-discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the university community are necessary for the fulfillment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed to promote this environment at each of the state universities. You are expected to treat your instructor and your fellow classmates with respect and kindness. In all correspondence and in Discussion Board postings, you should show respect for the viewpoints of others who may disagree with you or see things from a different perspective. Criticizing, ridiculing, insulting, or belittling others will not be accepted. Keep in mind that electronic communications do not have the advantage of nonverbal cues that are so much a part of interpersonal communication. Humor or satire can sometimes be misinterpreted in strictly electronic communication forums.

 

Threatening or disruptive behavior:

Self -discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the classroom or studio and university community are necessary for a conducive learning and teaching environment. Threatening or violent behavior will result in the administrative withdrawal of the student from the class. Disruptive behavior may result in the removal of the student from the class. Threatening, violent, or disruptive behavior will not be tolerated in this class, and will be handled in accordance with ASU policy. For more information please visit: https://eoss.asu.edu/dos/srr/PoliciesAndProceduresand  https://eoss.asu.edu/dos/safety/ThreateningBehavior.

 

Title IX:

Title IX is a federal law that provides that no person be excluded on the basis of sex from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity.  Both Title IX and university policy make clear that sexual violence and harassment based on sex is prohibited.  An individual who believes they have been subjected to sexual violence or harassed on the basis of sex can seek support, including counseling and academic support, from the university.  If you or someone you know has been harassed on the basis of sex or sexually assaulted, you can find information and resources athttp://sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/faqs/students

 

Classroom Behavior (Technology Usage):

It is encouraged that you bring technology (cell phones, tablets and laptops) to class to help you take notes and do research, however please turn off cell phone ringers and do not use your phone to make personal calls in class or use any technology to use social media in class. Do not answer your phone in class. If you believe you are receiving an emergency call, please step outside to take it.

 

Withdrawal:

If you are unable to complete the course, it is your responsibility to arrange for withdrawal from the class. You will not be automatically withdrawn and unless you are officially withdrawn from the course you will receive a final grade based upon the total points you have earned for the semester. Students are required to pay all tuition and fees for any registered course unless enrollment is officially cancelled during the 100% refund period.Please visit the Academic Calendar to review the withdrawal deadlines for this semester. For more information on Drop/Add and Withdrawl visit: https://students.asu.edu/drop-add

 

Special Accommodations:

Your instructor is willing to make any reasonable adaptations for limitations due to any documented disability, including learning disabilities. Please contact the instructor during office hours or by appointment to discuss any special needs you may have. You must contact the Disability Resource Center to process the paperwork for special course accommodations. To request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact the ASU Disability Resource Center (http://www.asu.edu/studentaffairs/ed/drc/# ; Phone: (480) 965-1234; TDD: (480) 965-9000). This is a very important step as accommodations may be difficult to make retroactively.   If you have a letter from their office indicating that you have a disability which requires academic accommodations, in order to assure that you receive your accommodations in a timely manner, please present this documentation to me no later than the end of the first week of the semester so that your needs can be addressed effectively.

 

Disability Support Services:

Students with disabilities must have an equally effective and equivalent educational opportunity as those students without disabilities. Students experiencing difficulty accessing course materials because of a disability are expected to contact the course instructor so that a solution can be found that provides all students equal access to course materials and technology. Qualified students with disabilities who will require disability accommodations in this class are encouraged to make their requests to me at the beginning of the semester either during office hours or by appointment. It may be difficult to make accommodations retroactively. Note: Prior to receiving disability accommodations, verification of eligibility from the Disability Resource Center (DRC) is required. Disability information is confidential.

 

Information for Students with Disabilities:

Students who feel they will need disability accommodations in this class but have not registered with the Disability Resource Center (DRC) should contact DRC immediately. Students should contact the Disability Resource Center on the campus that your class is being held. Campus-specific location and contact information can be found on the DRC website. DRC offices are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. Check the DRC website for eligibility and documentation policies (https://eoss.asu.edu/drc) 

 

Policy on Sexual Discrimination:

Policy on sexual discrimination as described in ACD 401, "Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation", including the fact that the instructor is a mandated reporter and therefore obligated to report any information regarding alleged acts of sexual discrimination. Arizona State University is committed to providing an environment free of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation for the entire university community, including all students, faculty members, staff employees, and guests. ASU expressly prohibits discriminationharassment, and retaliation by employees, students, contractors, or agents of the university based on any protected status: race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, and genetic information.As an employee of ASU, I am a mandated reporter and obligated to report instances of reported or suspected incidences of sexual harassment.

 

Student Rights and Responsibilities:

Students must abide by all the requirements stated in this syllabus. In addition, all students should be aware of their rights and responsibilities at Arizona State University. Please reference the college catalog and student handbook for student rights and responsibilities.

These can be found here:

http://herbergerinstitute.asu.edu/students/undergrad/documents/student_handbook.pdf

 

Student Services & Resources:

You will find a list of student resources at: https://tutoring.asu.edu/student-resources

Resources included are advisement, registration, financial aid, disability services, counseling, tutoring, library, and more.

 

Academic Calendar and Important Dates:

The academic calendar can be found here: https://students.asu.edu/academic-calendar

 

Subject to change:

The Instructor reserves the right to change portions of this syllabus (assignments, deadlines etc.) by verbal instructions during scheduled class time. The student is responsible for noting changes and acting accordingly. Grading and absence policies are not subject to change.

 

Computer, Internet, and Electronic Communications Policy:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd125.html

Missed Classes Due to University Sanctioned Activities:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-02.html

Accommodations for Religious Practices:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-04.html

Handling Disruptive, Threatening, or Violent Individuals on Campus:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/ssm/ssm104-02.html

For more information, refer to: www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-10.html

 

University Course Guidelines can be found here:

https://provost.asu.edu/curriculum-development/changemaker/syllabus-guidelines

 

IMPORTANT UNIVERSITY DATES

Please make a note of these important dates during the fall 2018 semester:

Session Dates and Deadlines

Session A: 7.5 weeks

(Aug 16 – Oct 5)

Session B: 7.5 weeks

(Oct 11 – Dec 1)

Session C: 15 weeks

(Aug 17 – Dec 1)

Classes Begin

August 16, 2018

October 10, 2018

August 16, 2018

Drop/Add Deadline

August 17, 2018

October 11, 2018

August 22, 2018

Tuition and Fees 100% Refund Deadline

August 22, 2018

October 16, 2018

August 29, 2018

Course Withdrawal Deadline

September 5, 2018

October 30, 2018

October 31, 2018

Complete Session Withdrawal  Deadline

October 5, 2018

November 30, 2018

November 30, 2018

Fall Break

October 6-9, 2018

Final Grades Due

October 8, 2018

December 3-10, 2018

December 3-10, 2018

For additional university deadlines and important dates for the fall 2018 term, please visit: students.asu.edu/academic-calendar.

 

 

ARA 460 / 560: GALLERY EXHIBITIONS: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CURATORIAL PRACTICE

Season / Year

Instructor Name: Dr.Grant Vetter

Office Location: TBA

Email: Grant.Vetter@asu.edu

Telephone:480.760.1709

Office hours: TBA

Class Location: TBA

Class Times: TBA

 

My primary office space is in the office at (Add) on ASU Tempe Campus. I am your instructor as well as a resource for information. If you have any questions relative to the course, please feel free to e-mail me at any time. If you have a time conflict with the scheduled office hours, a meeting time can be made that is mutually convenient. 

 

Course Description: 

Gallery Exhibitions: Contemporary Issuesin Curatorial Practice is a lecture and practicum course which provides weekly lectures on the history of curatorial practice as well as practical experience organizing an exhibition. Students will learn about the development of exhibition practices through lectures on significant exhibitions, curatorial methodologies, design principles, and critical readings. Each week we will cover over forty significant exhibitions in lecture with a focus on addressing their organization, reception and lasting impact on the field of curatorial practice. Students will develop their own curatorial project with a timeline, proposal, press, budgets, contacts, gallery layout, advertising plan, and selected venue. 

 

Enrollment Requirements: 

None. 

 

Course Objectives:Students will gain a comprehensive overview of contemporary issues in curatorial practice as well as learn about the diverse methodologies used by curators today. Each student will learn how to research and organize their own exhibition, including developing a working thesis for an exhibition, a research archive of images, how to write a press release, how to design the layout of an exhibition and how to advertise or promote the exhibition. Upon completion of the course, students will be given the option to submit their proposal to the gallery committee at ASU, if they so choose. Students pursuing museum studies, curatorial studies or art entrepreneurship can produce an exhibition that that would like to curate in the future as a portfolio piece. 

 

Student Learning Outcomes: 

  • Knowledge of critical histories and contemporary practices in curating. 
  • The ability to develop an exhibition concept from beginning to end. 
  • The ability to write press, advertise and produce other promotional materials related to exhibitions.
  • The ability to mobilize different curatorial strategies in service of viewer engagement. 
  • The ability to create a practical timeline for funding, shipping, installation, deinstallation, and exhibition design around Best Practices in the arts.
  • Learning how to work with artists and the greater arts community. 

 

Assignments:

InGallery Exhibitions: Contemporary Issues in Curatorial Practice, the students develop an archive of materials related to an exhibition proposal that they will develop over the course of the class. This includes learning about different methodologies of curatorial practice and understanding the practical means of submitting, advertising and carrying out an exhibition at the SOA and/or other venues. In addition to developing an exhibition proposal they also engage with artists, guest curators, exhibition preparation, field trips, gallery sitting, and may have the opportunity to talk to the public about SOA art programming. 

Week 1 Lecture: Introduction to the Course & The 10 Steps to Curating. 

Homework: Begin thinking about a topic that you would like to curate a contemporary art exhibition about. 

Readings: The Art of Museum Exhibitions: How Story and Imagination Create Aesthetic Experience. By Leslie Bedford. “Chapter 6: Creating and Experiencing the Exhibition Medium.” & Do Museums Still Need Objects? By Steven Conn. “Chapter 1: Do Museums Still Need Objects?”

 

Week 2 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Relational Aesthetics, Part I.

Homework: Pick a topic to curate an exhibition about –5 points. 

Readings: Relational Aesthetics. By Nicolas Bourriaud. “Chapter 1: “Relational Form.” & Artificial Hells: participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship. “Chapter 1: The Social Turn: Collaboration and Its Discontents.” By Claire Bishop. 

 

Week 3 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Relational Aesthetics, Part II.

Homework: Research other exhibitions on that topic and collect as many press releases or catalogs as you can find on the same or similar themes. Collect this in your archive – 10pts

Readings: Strike Art: Contemporary Art and the Post-Occupy Condition. “Chapter 4: The Arts of Occupation: Zuccotti Park, Site-Specificity and Beyond.” By Yates McKee. & Seeing Power: Art and Activism in the 21stCentury. By Nato Thompson. “Chapter 7: Occupying Space.”

 

Week 4 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and New Media, Part I. 

Homework:Build an archive of at least 20 images that fit your exhibition topic – 20 pts.

Readings: Museums Between Two Worlds: Curating and Exhibition Design of Internet and New Media Artworks within Virtual and Physical Art Environments. By Jennifer Minasian. “Chapter 1: From an Administrator to a 21stCentury Curatorial Producer: The Role of Curators within Virtual Art Environments.” & Curating the Digital: Space for Art and Interaction. Edited by David Engladn, Thecla Schiphorst and Nick Bryan-Kinns. “Chapter 1: Curating the Digital.” By David England. 

 

Week 5 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and New Media, Part II.

Homework:Pick 5 possible venues to for your exhibition that makes sense with your topic – 5pts.

Readings: Virtuality and the Art of the Exhibition: Curatorial Design for the Mutimedial Museum. By Vince Dziekan. “Chapter 5: The Multimedial Museum” & Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media. By Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook. “Chapter 2: The Art Formerly Known as New Media.”

 

Week 6 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Post-humanism. Part I.

Homework: Pick a method or methods for organizing and analyzing your exhibition topic. Turn in notes that answer the 4 methodological questions in relation to your exhibition topic to the best of your ability – 10pts. 

Readings: “Curating in / as Common / s: Posthuman Curating and Computational Cultures.” By M. Tyzlik-Carver. & “How the Arts Post-Human Turn Began in Kassel.” By Susanne Pfeffer. 

 

Week 7 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Post-humanism, Part II.

Homework: Pick a location/institution for your exhibition and make a floorplan layout of your exhibition that considers the order and relevance of the works in your exhibition – 5pts. 

Readings: “Posthuman Perfomativity of the Curating-Curatorial.” By Jussi Koitela. & “New Romance: Art and the Posthuman – a Curatorial Essay.” By Anne Davis. 

 

Week 8 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and the Anthropos(cene), Part I.

Homework: Write the press release for the exhibition and turn it in – 5 pt.

Reading: Curating the Planet – “How to exhibit the Anthroposcene and Why.” By Nina Möllens.& Curating the Future: Museums, Communities and Climate Change. Edited by Jennifer Newell, Libby Robin and Kirsten Wehner. “Displaying the Anthroposcene in and Beyond the Museum.”By Libby Robin, Dag Avango, Luke Keogh, Nina Möllens and Helmuth Trischler. 

 

Week 9 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and the Anthropos(cene), Part II.

Homework: Write the wall didactic that will greet visitors as they enter the exhibition – 5 pts.

Readings: Curating the Future: Museums, Communities and Climate Change. Edited by Jennifer Newell, Libby Robin and Kirsten Wehner.“The Art of the Anthroposcene.” By William L. Fox. & Field to Pallet: Dialogues on Soil and Art in the Anthroposcene.The Art of Decay: Soil Decomposition Explored through the Visual Arts.” By Farrah Fatemi and Laurea Fatemi. 

 

Week 10:Spring Break / Holiday

 

Week 11 Lecture:Curatorial Practice and Hyper-Objects / Object-Oriented Knowledge, Part I.

Homework:Write the information cards that will go with each piece including greater contextualization that relates to the exhibition concept – 20 pts.

Readings:“Curating Hyper-Objects” & “Curating Materials” by Timothy Morton. Timothy Morton and Han Ulrich Obrist Interview. DIS Magazine. 

 

Week 12 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Hyper-Objects / Object-Oriented Knowledge, Part II.

Homework:Make you final powerpoint presentation for the class of your exhibition project following the categories on the handout – 25 pts. 

Readings:The Objects of Experience: Transforming Visitor-Object Encounters in Museums. By. Elizabeth Wood and Kirsten F. Latham. “Section I: Thinking About Objects. Chapter 1: Object Knowledge” & “Chapter 2: The Object Knowledge Framework.”

 

Week 13: Student Presentations: Share your Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 mins).

 

Week 14: Student Presentations: Share you Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 mins).

 

Week 15: Guest Speaker / Field Trip

 

Due Dates and Late Work 

Unless otherwise instructed, all assignments are due at the beginning of class the day of the specified due date.

This is especially true on presentation days because you will be presenting. The assignment due dates will be listed on the assignment descriptions posted to Blackboard. Unless Blackboard goes down for the entire time between when the assignment is given and when it is due, late assignments will not be accepted. 

Required Primary and Secondary Materials (e.g., readings, videos, podcasts, films and studio supplies) 

There is no standard text for the course. Readings will be posted in Canvas.

 

Course Itinerary (Schedule):

WEEK 1: Introduction to Course Material& The 10 Steps to Curating

WEEK 2: Week 2 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Relational Aesthetics, Part I – Step 1: Pick a Topic. 

Week 3 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Relational Aesthetics, Part II – Step 2: Research Exhibitions on the same Topic.

Week 4 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and New Media, Part I  – Step 3: Develop an Archive of Artists/Images.

Week 5 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and New Media, Part II – Step 4: Pick an appropriate Venue(s).

Week 6 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Post-humanism. Part I – Step 5: Pick a Curatorial Method(s).

Week 7 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Post-humanism, Part II – Step 6: Pick a Location and Develop the Exhibition Layout.

Week 8 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and the Anthropos(cene), Part I – Step 7: Write a Press Release

WEEK 9: Week 9 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and the Anthropos(cene), Part II – Step 8: Write a Wall Didactic.

WEEK 10: SPRING BREAK

Week 11 Lecture:Curatorial Practice and Hyper-Objects, Part I – Step 9: Write Title Cards with Greater Contextual Information.

Week 12 Lecture: Curatorial Practice and Hyper-Objects, Part II – Step 10: Organize You Final Presentation / Proposal and Pitch Your Exhibition Topic.

WEEK 13: Student Presentations – Share your Exhibition Proposal with the class (10 mins).

WEEK 14: Student Presentations – Share your Proposal with the class.

WEEK 15:Guest Speaker / Field Trip

 

Grading, including grade scale 

Point equal Percentages 

Homework assignment Week 2:Pick a topic to curate an exhibition around as well as a time period or periods, geographic local and/or locals and the culture or cultures that you want to investigate. Write these down and turn them in – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 3:Research other exhibitions on that topic and collect as many press releases or catalogs as you can find on the same or similar themes. Collect this in your archive. Print these out and turn them in – 10 pts

Homework assignment Week 4:Build an archive of at least 20 images that fit your exhibition topic. Print these out and turn them in – 20 pts (Always include the full name, title of the piece, year of completion, medium, dimensions and a few facts about each piece that pertain to the exhibition topic)

Homework assignment Week 5:Pick 5 possible venues to for your exhibition that makes sense with your topic. Write these down and turn them in – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 6:Pick a method or methods for organizing and analyzing your exhibition topic. Turn in notes that answer the 4 methodological questions in relation to your exhibition topic to the best of your ability – 10 pts 

Homework assignment Week 7:Pick a location/institution for your exhibition and make a floorplan layout of your exhibition that considers the order and relevance of the works in your exhibition – 5pts. 

Homework assignment Week 8Write the press release for the exhibition and turn it in – 5 pt.

Homework assignment Week 9:Write the wall didactic that will greet visitors as they enter the exhibition – 5 pts

Homework assignment Week 10:- Holiday

Homework assignment Week 11Write the information cards that will go with each piece including greater contextualization that relates to the exhibition concept – 20 pts.

Homework Week 12:Make your final power point presentation following the presentation guide – 25 pts.

Homework Week 13:Student Presentations

Homework Week 14:Student Presentations

Week 15: Guest Speaker / Field Trip

 

Total Point Breakdown

Homework: 75 points

Final Presentation: 25 points

Total100 points 

 

Participation Policy

You are fully encouraged to ask questions at any time in the course and to bring a computer, tablet or other device to class for notetaking, looking up other information related to class topics, research purposes, etc. It is not mandatory, but it is recommended. 

You should not be on a computer, tablet, your phone or any other device accessing any information that does not pertain to class. You should not be watching movies, posting on social networks, etc. 

The T.A. will be sitting at the back of class monitoring. If the T.A. has to interrupt class to ask you to refocus your attention on the course material you will lose points. 

1st offense: 1 pt

2nd offense: 2 pts

3rd offense: 4 pts

4th offense: 8 pts

5th offense: 16 pts

Please, do not access unrelated class material. 

You should also not be visiting with classmates, texting, etc., during class. Anything disruptive to the class environment will result in a loss of points.

 

Grade Scale 

98-100 

A+ 

93-97 

90-92 

A- 

88-89 

B+ 

83-87 

80-82 

B- 

78-79 

C+ 

70-77 

60-69 

0-59 

 

 

Attendance Policy:
The instructor’s general policy AND university policy on absences due to religious observance and university sanctioned activities such as: 

Attendance and participation for the duration of the class period is mandatory. If you have more than 3 absences (unexcused), your final grade will be lowered 1/3 grade for each subsequent absence (i.e. B to B-).  You should notify me by email prior to absence if possible and provide doctor’s note where applicable. Repeated tardiness and leaving class early will be recorded, and as a result, your final grade will be lowered.  It is the student's responsibility to keep track of his/her absences. 

Excused absences related to religious observances/practices in accord with ACD 304–04, “Accommodation for Religious Practices.” Students may be excused for the observance of religious holidays. Students should notify the instructor at the beginning of the semester about the need to be absent from class due to religious observances. Students will be responsible for materials covered during their absence and should consult with the instructor to arrange reasonable accommodation for missed exams or other required assignments.

Excused absences related to university sanctioned activities in accord withACD 304–02, “Missed Classes Due to University-Sanctioned Activities.” SAMPLE STATEMENT:  Students required to miss classes due to university sanctioned activities will not be counted absent. However, absence from class or examinations due to university-sanctioned activities does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required during the period of the absence. Students should inform the instructor early in the semester of upcoming scheduled absences and immediately upon learning of unscheduled required class absences. Reasonable accommodation to make up missed exams or other required assignments will be made. Consult the instructor BEFORE the absence to arrange for this accommodation.

 

Academic Integrity and Student Code of Conduct:

Besides academic performance, students should exhibit the qualities of honesty and integrity. Every student is expected to produce his/her original, independent work. Any student whose work indicates a violation of the ASU Academic Misconduct Policy including cheating, plagiarism, and dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism is defined as deliberately passing off someone else’s words or ideas as your

own. All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. Arizona State University and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts expect the highest standards of academic integrity from all students. Failure to meet these standards may result in suspension or expulsion from the university or other sanctions as specified in the University Student Academic Integrity Policy. For more information, please see the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy: http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity.Per ASU policy, a student may not avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty by withdrawing from a course, and may be placed back in the course in order to face sanctions resulting from academic integrity violations. You are responsible for abiding by this policy.

 

In addition, ASU adheres to a university-wide Student Code of Conduct. The philosophy behind this policy states: The aim of education is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the individual. The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change and respect for the rights of all individuals. Self-discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the university community are necessary for the fulfillment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed to promote this environment at each of the state universities.

 

Instructor Absence Policy:

Students should wait for an absent instructor15 minutes in class sessions of 90 minutes or less, and 30 minutes for those lasting more than 90 minutes, unless directed otherwise by someone from the academic unit.   

 

Academic Integrity and Student Code of Conduct:

Besides academic performance, students should exhibit the qualities of honesty and integrity. Every student is expected to produce his/her original, independent work. Any student whose work indicates a violation of the ASU Academic Misconduct Policy including cheating, plagiarism, and dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism is defined as deliberately passing off someone else’s words or ideas as your own. All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. Arizona State University and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts expect the highest standards of academic integrity from all students. Failure to meet these standards may result in suspension or expulsion from the university or other sanctions as specified in the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy       (http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity), “[e]ach student must act with honesty and integrity, and must respect the rights of others in carrying out all academic assignments.” This policy also defines academic dishonesty and sets a process for faculty members and colleges to sanction dishonesty. Violations of this policy fall into five broad areas that include but are not limited to:

  • Cheating on an academic evaluation or assignments 
  • Plagiarizing
  • Academic deceit, such as fabricating data or information
  • Aiding Academic Integrity Policy violations and inappropriately collaborating
  • Falsifying academic records

I sanction any incidents of academic dishonesty in my courses using University and HIDA    guidelines. Should you have any question about whether or not something falls subject to this clause, feel free to contact me or review the university policy on academic integrity at the above link. Per ASU policy, a student may not avoid the consequences of academic dishonesty by withdrawing from a course, and may be placed back in the course in order to face sanctions resulting from academic integrity violations. You are responsible for abiding by this policy.

 

Copyright:

Students must refrain from uploading to any course shell, discussion board, or website used by the course instructor or other course forum, material that is not the student's original work, unless the students first comply with all applicable copyright laws; faculty members reserve the right to delete materials on the grounds of suspected copyright infringement. A statement that the course content, including lectures and other handouts, is  copyrighted material. Students may not share outside the class, upload, sell, or distribute course content or notes taken during the conduct of the course (see ACD 304–06, “Commercial Note Taking Services” for more information). THIS CONTENT IS PROTECTED AND MAY NOT BE SHARED, UPLOADED, SOLD, OR DISTRIBUTED.

 

Student Conduct:

ASU adheres to a university-wide Student Code of Conduct. The philosophy behind this policy states: The aim of education is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the individual. The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change and respect for the rights of all individuals. Self-discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the university community are necessary for the fulfillment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed to promote this environment at each of the state universities. You are expected to treat your instructor and your fellow classmates with respect and kindness. In all correspondence and in Discussion Board postings, you should show respect for the viewpoints of others who may disagree with you or see things from a different perspective. Criticizing, ridiculing, insulting, or belittling others will not be accepted. Keep in mind that electronic communications do not have the advantage of nonverbal cues that are so much a part of interpersonal communication. Humor or satire can sometimes be misinterpreted in strictly electronic communication forums.

 

Threatening or disruptive behavior:

Self -discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the classroom or studio and university community are necessary for a conducive learning and teaching environment. Threatening or violent behavior will result in the administrative withdrawal of the student from the class. Disruptive behavior may result in the removal of the student from the class. Threatening, violent, or disruptive behavior will not be tolerated in this class, and will be handled in accordance with ASU policy. For more information please visit: https://eoss.asu.edu/dos/srr/PoliciesAndProceduresand  https://eoss.asu.edu/dos/safety/ThreateningBehavior.

 

Title IX:

Title IX is a federal law that provides that no person be excluded on the basis of sex from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity.  Both Title IX and university policy make clear that sexual violence and harassment based on sex is prohibited.  An individual who believes they have been subjected to sexual violence or harassed on the basis of sex can seek support, including counseling and academic support, from the university.  If you or someone you know has been harassed on the basis of sex or sexually assaulted, you can find information and resources athttp://sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/faqs/students

 

Classroom Behavior (Technology Usage):

It is encouraged that you bring technology (cell phones, tablets and laptops) to class to help you take notes and do research, however please turn off cell phone ringers and do not use your phone to make personal calls in class or use any technology to use social media in class. Do not answer your phone in class. If you believe you are receiving an emergency call, please step outside to take it.

 

Withdrawal:

If you are unable to complete the course, it is your responsibility to arrange for withdrawal from the class. You will not be automatically withdrawn and unless you are officially withdrawn from the course you will receive a final grade based upon the total points you have earned for the semester. Students are required to pay all tuition and fees for any registered course unless enrollment is officially cancelled during the 100% refund period.Please visit the Academic Calendar to review the withdrawal deadlines for this semester. For more information on Drop/Add and Withdrawl visit: https://students.asu.edu/drop-add

 

Special Accommodations:

Your instructor is willing to make any reasonable adaptations for limitations due to any documented disability, including learning disabilities. Please contact the instructor during office hours or by appointment to discuss any special needs you may have. You must contact the Disability Resource Center to process the paperwork for special course accommodations. To request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact the ASU Disability Resource Center (http://www.asu.edu/studentaffairs/ed/drc/# ; Phone: (480) 965-1234; TDD: (480) 965-9000). This is a very important step as accommodations may be difficult to make retroactively.   If you have a letter from their office indicating that you have a disability which requires academic accommodations, in order to assure that you receive your accommodations in a timely manner, please present this documentation to me no later than the end of the first week of the semester so that your needs can be addressed effectively.

 

Disability Support Services:

Students with disabilities must have an equally effective and equivalent educational opportunity as those students without disabilities. Students experiencing difficulty accessing course materials because of a disability are expected to contact the course instructor so that a solution can be found that provides all students equal access to course materials and technology. Qualified students with disabilities who will require disability accommodations in this class are encouraged to make their requests to me at the beginning of the semester either during office hours or by appointment. It may be difficult to make accommodations retroactively. Note: Prior to receiving disability accommodations, verification of eligibility from the Disability Resource Center (DRC) is required. Disability information is confidential.

 

Information for Students with Disabilities:

Students who feel they will need disability accommodations in this class but have not registered with the Disability Resource Center (DRC) should contact DRC immediately. Students should contact the Disability Resource Center on the campus that your class is being held. Campus-specific location and contact information can be found on the DRC website. DRC offices are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. Check the DRC website for eligibility and documentation policies (https://eoss.asu.edu/drc) 

 

Policy on Sexual Discrimination:

Policy on sexual discrimination as described in ACD 401, "Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation", including the fact that the instructor is a mandated reporter and therefore obligated to report any information regarding alleged acts of sexual discrimination. Arizona State University is committed to providing an environment free of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation for the entire university community, including all students, faculty members, staff employees, and guests. ASU expressly prohibits discriminationharassment, and retaliation by employees, students, contractors, or agents of the university based on any protected status: race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, and genetic information.As an employee of ASU, I am a mandated reporter and obligated to report instances of reported or suspected incidences of sexual harassment.

 

Student Rights and Responsibilities:

Students must abide by all the requirements stated in this syllabus. In addition, all students should be aware of their rights and responsibilities at Arizona State University. Please reference the college catalog and student handbook for student rights and responsibilities.

These can be found here:

http://herbergerinstitute.asu.edu/students/undergrad/documents/student_handbook.pdf

 

Student Services & Resources:

You will find a list of student resources at: https://tutoring.asu.edu/student-resources

Resources included are advisement, registration, financial aid, disability services, counseling, tutoring, library, and more.

 

Academic Calendar and Important Dates:

The academic calendar can be found here: https://students.asu.edu/academic-calendar

 

Subject to change:

The Instructor reserves the right to change portions of this syllabus (assignments, deadlines etc.) by verbal instructions during scheduled class time. The student is responsible for noting changes and acting accordingly. Grading and absence policies are not subject to change.

 

Computer, Internet, and Electronic Communications Policy:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd125.html

Missed Classes Due to University Sanctioned Activities:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-02.html

Accommodations for Religious Practices:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-04.html

Handling Disruptive, Threatening, or Violent Individuals on Campus:
http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/ssm/ssm104-02.html

For more information, refer to: www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-10.html

 

University Course Guidelines can be found here:

https://provost.asu.edu/curriculum-development/changemaker/syllabus-guidelines

 

IMPORTANT UNIVERSITY DATES

Please make a note of these important dates during the fall 2018 semester:

Session Dates and Deadlines

Session A: 7.5 weeks

(Aug 16 – Oct 5)

Session B: 7.5 weeks

(Oct 11 – Dec 1)

Session C: 15 weeks

(Aug 17 – Dec 1)

Classes Begin

August 16, 2018

October 10, 2018

August 16, 2018

Drop/Add Deadline

August 17, 2018

October 11, 2018

August 22, 2018

Tuition and Fees 100% Refund Deadline

August 22, 2018

October 16, 2018

August 29, 2018

Course Withdrawal Deadline

September 5, 2018

October 30, 2018

October 31, 2018

Complete Session Withdrawal  Deadline

October 5, 2018

November 30, 2018

November 30, 2018

Fall Break

October 6-9, 2018

Final Grades Due

October 8, 2018

December 3-10, 2018

December 3-10, 2018

For additional university deadlines and important dates for the fall 2018 term, please visit: students.asu.edu/academic-calendar.

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